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600 Level Courses

COSC 614 - Operating Systems II

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 514

Continuation of COSC 514. Advanced topics in virtual memory management, file and data base system management, operating systems security, disk performance optimization, analytic modeling, and distributed operating systems. Case studies in operating systems.

 

COSC 615 - Performance Evaluation

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 514 and COSC 516

A survey of computer systems performance issues and evaluation methodologies. Topics include workload characterization, parallelism, concepts in hardware/software, computer measurement tools (e.g., hardware and software monitors, modeling and benchmarking), system utilization and performance profiles, and systems evaluation methodology (including the analysis and optimization of CPU, memory, channels, and peripheral resources).

 

COSC 618 - Computer Graphics II 

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 518 and COSC 528

Continuation of COSC 518. Topics will be chosen from three-dimensional (3D) interactive graphics, raster display system architecture, 3D homogeneous coordinate system, hidden surface elimination, modeling, shading, shadow generation, anti-aliasing, ray-tracing, fractals, animation techniques, color theory, graphics languages, and modern graphics.

 

COSC 623 - Logic, Computability & Automata II 

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 523

Continuation of COSC 523. The theory of abstract mathematical machines. Structural and behavioral classification of automata; finite state automata; theory of regular sets.  Pushdown automata, linear bounded automata. Finite transducers. Universal Turing machines.

 

COSC 631 - Database Information Systems II 

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 531

Continuation of COSC 531. Advanced topics in data base design and information management systems. Topics include normalization and semantic modeling, view integration, recovery and concurrency, security and integrity, data base machines, distributed and heterogeneous data base management, intelligent data bases, and object-oriented systems

 

COSC 641 - Numerical Analysis II 

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 541

This course is a continuation of COSC 541. The topics include numerical differentiation and integration, the solution of initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations, methods of solving nonlinear systems of equations; other topics as time permits.

 

COSC 645 - Applied Cryptography

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 535

This course teaches students some of the basic paradigms and principles of modern cryptography and their applications. After mathematical preliminaries from algebra and number theory, we will explore the following topics in the field: foundations of cryptography, public key cryptography, pseudorandom generators, elliptic curve cryptography, and fundamental limits to information operations.

 

COSC 661 - Compiler Design & Construction II

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 561

Continuation of COSC 561. Advanced topics in compiler design and construction. Automated compiler tools and compiler compilers. Advanced code optimization techniques. Compilation of different computational models.  Role of compilers in natural language processing.

 

COSC 665 - Software Engineering II

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 565

The course will cover software life-cycle models and different phrases of the software development process. Object-oriented techniques are applicable. Students will have a group project on developing complex software systems.

 

COSC 673  - Artificial Intelligence II 

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 573

Continuation of COSC 573. Advanced topics in artificial intelligence, such as natural language understanding, computer vision, machine learning, robotics, neural networks, automatic theorem proving, and an in-depth look into the design and implementation of intelligent computer systems.

 

COSC 675  - Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 522

General enumeration methods, difference equations, generating functions. Elements of graph theory, matrix representations of graphs, applications of graph theory to transport networks, matching theory and graphical algorithms.

 

COSC 676 - Queuing Theory In Computer Science 

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 504 and COSC 522 

The development of queueing theory and the application of that theory of discrete simulations, in general, and to computer systems, in particular. Topics include random processes, characterization of different queueing systems, the classical single-server exponential queueing system model, additional single and multiple-server queueing models, including birth-death processes and finite sources, and the assumptions and limitations of the various queueing models. The applications of queueing theory to computer systems are emphasized.

 

COSC 678 - Modeling & Simulation

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 504 and COSC 522

A study of construction of models that simulate real systems. The methodology of solution should include probability and distribution theory, statistical estimation and inference, the use of random variables, and validation procedures. A simulation language should be used for the solution of typical problems.

 

COSC 685 - Computer Communication Networks II

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 514 and COSC 585

Continuation of COSC 585. Advanced topics in computer networks and their applications.  Inter-networking: international gateways and datagram internets. Emphasis on the characteristics, implementation and configuration of Local Area Networks (LANs), Wide Area Networks (WANs), and Integrated Services Digital Networks (ISDNs).

 

COSC 687 - Distributed Computer Systems

3 Credits

Prerequisites: COSC 514 and COSC 585

Introduction to the concepts and the design principles used in constructing distributed computer systems. Coverage of topics from the architectural foundations of distributed systems through networks; file servers including transaction handling; replication; and security issues, with descriptions of the design and the facilities offered in some specific systems. Areas of applications include distributed data base management, interoperable information systems, and distributed artificial intelligence.

 

COSC 690-692 Selected Topics (Computer Science) 

3 Credits

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor 

Presentation of advanced topics reflecting state-of-the-art developments in computer science.

  

COSC 696 - Master's Thesis in Computer Science I

3 Credits

Prerequisites: A minimum of 18 Graduate Credits in COSC

A research problem in the area of computer science is chosen by the student under the supervision of a faculty advisor from the department of computer science. An advisory committee consisting of the thesis advisor and at least two other faculty members will be constituted. Research must be carried out and concluded over a period of two consecutive semesters and submitted in the form of a formal thesis with the consent of advisory committee. Thesis will be defended in an oral presentation by the student to the faculty.

 

COSC 697 - Master's Thesis in Computer Science II

3 Credits

Prerequisites: A minimum of 18 Graduate Credits in COSC and COSC 696

A research problem in the area of computer science is chosen by the student under the supervision of a faculty advisor from the department of computer science. An advisory committee consisting of the thesis advisor and at least two other faculty members will be constituted. Research must be carried out and concluded over a period of two consecutive semesters and submitted in the form of a formal thesis with the consent of advisory committee. Thesis will be defended in an oral presentation by the student to the faculty.

 

COSC 698 - Applied Research In Computer Science

3 Credits

Prerequisites: A minimum of 27 Graduate Credits in COSC 

This course requires the student to perform research in computer science somewhat less in scope than a master's thesis. Such research should adequately demonstrate the student's proficiency in the subject material. The research must be applied in a semester-long project and concluded with a short seminar and a comprehensive paper.